Book Endorsements (August 2008)

FOREWORDDermot Desmond, Director, IIU


ENDORSEMENTS


The title of this interesting and stimulating book demonstrates its purpose. It challenges Ireland to really think about the complex relationship between global economic integration and our defining differences. It makes a real contribution to a valuable debate.
-
Peter Sutherland, Chairman BP/Former EU Commissioner/Director General, GATT and WTO. 


 

This book confirms something not widely appreciated: as Irish business becomes global, the local is as important as ever. Innovation is about creating value through quality, relationships, service and trust. To succeed, people’s hearts as well as minds must be engaged.

- Seán Quinn, Founder, Quinn Group

 

 

Both authors, already highly respected for their independent minded approach to the relationship between culture and socio-economic performance, here hone their thinking into an invigorating contribution to the debate on what sort of society Ireland should become over the next generation.

- Prof. Joe Lee, Director, Glucksman Ireland House, New York University


 

The book addresses one of the key areas mostly ignored when assessing the DNA of successful business. A culture incorporating innovation, creativity, flexibility and learning nurtures an environment in which business can thrive. It offers a unique insight into the effects culture has on making Ireland a world-class economy, and in my view, is vital reading for every business person in Ireland and for anyone considering setting up business in the country.

 - Pádraig Ó Céidigh, Chairman, Aer Arann/Ernst & Young Irish Entrepreneur of the Year 2002

 

 

Their work highlights the need for a debate on how a national system of innovation is best supported by a diversity of ways of learning and knowing.    
- Professor Seán Ó Riain, Department of Sociology, NUI Maynooth, Maynooth


 

This book begins a great and important project: the reconstitution of a truly Irish culture atop a revived economy and people.  It is necessarily thorough and written for the motivated.  But for those of us who labour in the field of Ireland’s future cultural development, it is a book we simply cannot do without.

- Marc Coleman, Economics Editor, Newstalk 106-108 fm



Healthy communities, bursting with vitality, provide a foundation that fosters innovation.  A real contribution of this book is that it illustrates why harnessing resources could prove fruitful in creating a truly dynamic and prosperous Irish learning society. 

- Mary Redmond, Founder, Irish Hospice Foundation and The Wheel.

 

 

This farsighted and penetrating work offers a compelling argument for the importance of the Irish language as a part of a dynamic new economic and political culture in Ireland. It offers an exciting vision of how all the languages of Ireland can be used to create a resourceful and inclusive society and a sustainable economy in post-boom Ireland.

- Professor Michael Cronin, Director, Centre for Translation and Textual Studies, DCU

   

The authors offer a timely assessment of how the innovation of the Revival shaped Irish life during the twentieth century. The book’s special contribution is to argue that the creativity that led to a culturally distinctive Ireland after independence can support an economically sustainable Ireland a century later.

- Frank Allen, Chief Executive, Railway Procurement Agency (Luas and Metro)

 


This is a work of superb clarity in how to push post Celtic Tiger Ireland forward in outlining how we can change from a “what we do, is who we are” to a “who we are, is what we can do” society. It is an extraordinary tour de force that must be read by those who are interested in how Ireland can compete successfully and sustainably in our globalised world.

- Danny McCoy, Director of Policy, Irish Business & Employers Confederation (IBEC)

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

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